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Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

3 edition of Northern leopard frog reintroduction strategy for Alberta found in the catalog.

Northern leopard frog reintroduction strategy for Alberta

Kris Kendell

Northern leopard frog reintroduction strategy for Alberta

by Kris Kendell

  • 77 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by Alberta Conservation Association in [Edmonton] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Northern leopard frog -- Reintroduction -- Alberta

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 25-31).

    StatementKris Kendell and Dave Prescott.
    SeriesConservation report series, Publication / Alberta Conservation Association -- no. T/156
    ContributionsPrescott, David R. C., Alberta Conservation Association.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQL668.E27 K4595 2007
    The Physical Object
    Paginationvi, 34 p. :
    Number of Pages34
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22562899M
    ISBN 109780778565499, 9780778565505
    LC Control Number2008396742

    The Alberta Northern Leopard Frog Recovery Plan, has been prepared by the Alberta Northern Leopard Frog Recovery Team to guide the management of this Threatened species over the next five years. The ultimate goal of this initiative is to achieve well-distributed, self-sustaining. Natural History: The Northern Leopard Frog is part of a large complex of closely related species that range across all of North America. Only the Northern Leopard Frog is found in Canada. Leopard Frogs eat a wide variety of prey, but mainly insects, spiders and other small invertebrates.

    Title. Habitat suitability index for the northern leopard frog in Alberta: model derivation and validation / Related Titles. Series: Alberta species at risk report ; no. Series: Publication (Alberta. Alberta Sustainable Resource Development) ; no. Full text of "Status of the northern leopard frog (Rana pipiens) in Alberta: update " See other formats.

    The Northern Leopard Frog belongs to the family Ranidae (true frogs) and the genus Rana. No subspecies are currently recognized (Green ). Description The Northern Leopard Frog is a medium-sized (50– mm snout-vent-length [svl]), semi-terrestrial frog. Distinguishing characteristics include two conspicuous cream-coloured dorsolateral File Size: KB. Roberts, W. The northern leopard frog - endangered in Alberta. Provincial Museum of Alberta Natural History Occassional Paper No. 9: Roberts, W.E. What happened to the leopard frogs? Alberta Naturalist Roberts, W.E. An action plan for the recovery of the northern leopard frog in Alberta.


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Northern leopard frog reintroduction strategy for Alberta by Kris Kendell Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Alberta Northern Leopard Frog Recovery Team (ANLFRT), which drafted a recovery plan, the Alberta Northern Leopard Frog Recovery Plan (ANLFRP) that was approved by the Minister in The ANLFRP describes strategies and actionsFile Size: 2MB. This wildlife status report looks at the northern leopard frog, a once-abundand species in the province whose population has declined dramatically over much of its historical North American range.

In Alberta, populations have been extirpated over much of western and central Alberta and are absent or greatly reduced in southern Alberta. Northern Leopard Frog Reintroduction Strategy for Alberta. Author(s) Kris Kendell and Dave Prescott. Summary. SPECIES ASSESSMENT FOR THE NORTHERN LEOPARD FROG (RANA PIPIENS) IN WYOMING prepared by BRIAN E.

SMITH 1 AND DOUG KEINATH 2 1Department of Biology Black Hills State University University Street UnitSpearfish, SD 2 Zoology Program Manager, Wyoming Natural Diversity Database, University of Wyoming, E.

University Ave, Dept.Laramie. The northern leopard frog is a fairly large species of frog, reaching about 11 cm ( in) in snout-to-vent length.

It varies from green to brown in dorsal color, with large, dark, circular spots on its back, sides, and legs. Each spot is normally bordered by a lighter : Ranidae. Prior to the late s, the northern leopard frog was a common and widely distributed amphibian throughout central and southern Alberta.

Unfortunately, the northern leopard frog has vanished from much of its former range Northern leopard frog reintroduction strategy for Alberta book the province and due to the continued declining populations it was designated as threatened under Alberta's Wildlife Act in The Magrath Northern Leopard Frog Reintroduction Project was established as a pilot project to test the effectiveness of local transplants using on-site rearing.

It has successfully demonstrated that the technique is feasible, and provides a template for future northern leopard frog reintroduction projects. vii. Alberta Wildlife Recoveries: Northern Leopard Frog. What are leopard frogs. One of the largest frog species found in Alberta, the northern leopard frog (Lithobates pipiens) varies in size between 2 and 5 can be easily distinguished by their green or brown colouration and the numerous dark spots that give them their name (Russell & Bauer ).

Alberta has implemented a Northern Leopard Frog recovery strategy (Alberta Northern Leopard Frog Recovery Team ). Phase one of this strategy was the provincial Northern Leopard Frog survey, which located frogs at 73 (41%) of the historic locations monitored (Kendell et al.

The northern leopard frog is now considered uncommon in a large portion of its range in the western United States, and declines of the species have been documented in most western states.

The range of the western population extends into the Canadian provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, southern Northwest Territories, Saskatchewan. NORTHERN LEOPARD FROG (Lithobates pipiens), ROCKY MOUNTAIN POPULATION IN CANADA. Under the Accord for the Protection of Species at Risk (), the federal, provincial, and territorial governments agreed to work together on legislation, programs, and policies to protect wildlife species at risk throughout Canada.

The Northern Leopard Frog Recovery Team is made up of government and non-government biologists, stakeholders and community members that are working together to improve populations and restore habitat of one of the most at-risk species in British Columbia.

Northern Leopard Frog populations across much of western Canada declined sharply in the s. Wildlife conservation, Northern leopard frog, Endangered species, Wildlife reintroduction Publisher [Edmonton]: Alberta Sustainable Resource Development, Fish & Wildlife Division, Resource Data and Species At Risk Section Collection albertagovernmentpublications; university_of_alberta_libraries; toronto Digitizing sponsor University of Alberta.

• Northern Leopard Frog Husbandry Manual. (Wind ) • A small scale rearing effort for Northern Leopard Frogs (Rana pipiens) in the Creston Wildlife Management Area.

(Adama et al. ) • Captive rearing and reintroduction of Northern Leopard Frogs (Rana pipiens) in the Creston Valley Wildlife Management Area, (Adama et al.

In Alberta, the Northern Leopard Frog historically occurred throughout the province south of 55ºN latitude and in the province’s northeastern corner (Alberta Northern Leopard.

Frog Recovery Team [ANLFRT], ), west to the foothills and lower eastern slopes of the Rocky Mountains. However, many records in the more central and northern. The northern leopard frog, R. pipiens, is common in North America, inhabiting twenty-six states and much of Canada (see adjacent map).

Habitat Rana pipiens live in a wide range of habitat, from open water and marshes to deserts and mountains (, ). Alberta, Endangered species, Habitat, leopard frogs, Northern leopard frog, Wildlife conservation, Wildlife management Call Number QL E27 W33 AVC.

Similar Species. In Ontario, the pickerel frog is the frog species most similar in appearance to the northern leopard frog.

The pickerel frog’s spots are angular and usually arranged into two rows down the back, whereas the leopard frog’s spots are rounded or oval and are in a more random pattern. A reintroduction program for Alberta's northern leopard frogs began in and was carried out by the Alberta Conservation Association and Alberta Fish and Wildlife.

Knowledge Gaps Since o young of year northern leopard frogs have been released, but. Leopard Frog. Scientific name: Rana pipiens. Classification: True Frog. Description: A green or brown frog with large, light-edged spots. Leopard Frogs also have prominent light-coloured dorsolateral ridges and a white belly.

They can grow to over 10 cm body length. Northern leopard frogs are so named for the array of irregularly shaped dark spots that adorn their backs and legs. They are greenish-brown in color with a pearly white underside and light-colored.Northern Leopard Frog Conservation Success Story.

During the latter half of the 20th century, Northern leopard frogs experienced considerable declines in several parts of their range, including Indiana. Init was listed as a Species of Special Concern.

However, the frogs have responded well to habitat restoration and are now relatively.Status: Once the most widespread frog species in North America, the number of northern leopard frogs began to decline in the mid Alberta, most populations remained healthy until about when they mysteriously disappeared from most sites in the central and southern parts of the province.